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cuts and the expiration of all the bush tax cuts. the latest in just a moment. right now, i'm joined by jamelle buoy. a staff writer for the american prospect magazine and "washington post" reporter, suzy kim. kevin williamson, dep deputy mag editor and a nonprofit group that advocates for social and economic equality. we're one day away from what most media are calling the fiscal cliff. if political concoction enacted by congress to frighten itself into passing deficit reduction measures which means unless congress acts in the next 48 hours the bush tax cuts will expire along with federal unemployment insurance and a broad package of the spending cuts including defense spending will take effect. do weeks of fruitless negotiations and john boehner and senate leader are working on a deal this morning to avoid the fiscal cliff, or as chris hayes and i call it, the fiscal curve. the deadline is soft. it's not like every american is going to be handed a bill on january 1st and there's way to manage the damage if the country goes over. the senate is set to convene this afternoon with the
is if they are giving on tax increases which we get the indication they are willing to do at least to some degree they would like to see something that addresses the long-term deficit. whether that can happen in this deal seems to be the problem. democrats have said if they can get something bigger they would be open to changes in entitlements. that is where things stand. there is clearly even handed on both sides saying they want to get things done. you know the clock is running and those signs make everyone think this may not resolve itself tonight. >> thank you very much. >>> let's go to the white house and kristen welker. hi there. >> reporter: hi, there. the white house is not commenting on these developments. senior administration officials say the action is going on on the hill right now. they are hesitant to weigh in. they don't want to disrupt any progress or setbacks that may be in the process of being resolved. so that is what the white house is saying publicly. i can tell you that behind the scenes it is a very busy day here at the white house. staffers have been on the phone with the
senator reed to do it, put a by on the floor to make sure that taxes on middle class families do not go up. and unemployment insurance is still available for two million people and lays the groundwork for economic growth and deficit reduction. >> everything that has been happening in the last several hours has been happening behind the scenes. we have correspondents tracking everything for you. we have luke, luke, i will start with you this hour. the senate officially reconvenes tomorrow afternoon. i assume that there's a lot of closed door talks going on right now. is that true? what can you tell us? >> reporter: that is true, staff from harry reed and mitch mcconnell have been negotiating through the daout the day and in picked up. we have heard that both sides are not budgeting. but we don't know, things can change at any moment. if we have to gauge how to talks have gone so far from the conversations we have had here around capitol hill, they have not been too good at the moment. all that being said though, craig, there's a lot that can happen over the next 48 hours. the deal obviously
think you can effective do what germany has done and actually having a high tax is not a problem, right? one of the central political problems in the united states is you have to raise tax revenue. why not raise tax revenue from a part of the economy where you want to discourage activity and use that for education. >> the private sector is sitting on more uninvested cash. this is not stock, not money given to owners. >> firms sitting on cash waiting to invest. they are waiting for cues. tacking them, taxing carbon would help give cues to drive investment into clean energy. another way -- >> they are very skeptical about clean energy. you also have to realize it's a terrible investment for the past decade. this is not an easy problem. >> one of the problems is lack of markets. the government could do a lot to fix that by consuming clean energy and vehicles. the federal government is in the u.s. is the single largest consumer of clean energy. if you add state and federal spending, if you look at the percentage of the gdp, the public sector, it's over 1%. >> and what helps is lots of natur
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4